When would you stop to think about that? When would you stop being obsessed or upset by that? Never.

Por Fabricio C. Boppré em 27/09/2012

No livro Will Oldham on Bonnie Prince Billy, uma espécie de diálogo entre Alan Licht e Will Oldham, algumas páginas são dedicadas às impressões de ambos sobre apresentações ao vivo. Will começa dizendo que, em suas turnês, prefere trabalhar com o profissional de som do próprio local do show do que levar um profissional próprio consigo. Um trecho da conversa que se segue:

AL: In some venues I feel like the sound person has a set idea about what it’s supposed to sound like, and there’s even a “sound” that they want to be uniform to the venue, which can compromise what a band is trying to do up onstage.

WO: Yeah, another thing that’s kind of thrilling for us is the idea that every show will be different because of the aesthetic of the sound person, and that people might come away with absolutely different opinions of the way a show sounded, based on what city they went to, because of the sound person, and that’s really exciting [laughs]. In the studio there’s a sound, of course, in the end that’s unknown at the beginning, but as all the elements reveal themselves the sound reveals itself, reveals how it’s supposed to be. But on tour it seems like if you begin to try to think that you have control over the sound, you’d never get any sleep. When would you stop to think about that? When would you stop being obsessed or upset by that? Never. With every different room, every different sound system, every different temperature, time of day or whatever affects the sound, it seems to be more advantageous to think of the room, and the technicians, as part of the novelty of the experience. They’re extra factors, if not members of the ensemble. They’re no quite that, but they’re factors in what makes one show different from another.

Categoria(s) associada(s): Literatura musical



Nenhum comentário.

Não é mais possível adicionar comentários para este post.